Colloques & Conférences


Conférence (vidéo) ⎜Japan’s Modern Castles: Reclaiming the Past and Proclaiming the Future

Conférencier : Ran Zwigenberg (Assistant Professor of Asian Studies, History and Jewish Studies, Pennsylvania State University)

Cette conférence présente un ouvrage en cours de parution.

Both home and abroad, Japan’s castles serve as prominent symbols of local, regional, and national identity. Castles occupy the center of most major Japanese cities and are universally recognizable as sites of heritage and as a link to the nation’s past. The current prominence of castles obscures their troubled modern history. After the restoration of 1868, castles, no longer of immediate military significance, became symbols of authority, on one hand, and of vaunted tradition on the other. Castles were major sites of exhibitions, where they were often contrasted with Japan’s achievements in acquiring modern technology, serving as potent illustrations of Wakon-yōsai (Japanese spirit and Western technology). As the specific role castles played changed over time, they became sites of fierce contention. Particularly, castles were a major factor in the militarization of Japanese society before the Second World War and, after 1945, were important tools for demilitarizing Japan both physically and symbolically to turn it into a “nation of peace and culture.” This talk examines Japan’s castles from the late nineteenth century to the present to reconsider narratives of continuity and change in modern Japan; examining the changing role of castles in Japan’s troubled politics of history.

Ran Zwigenberg est l’auteur de Hiroshima: The Origins of Global Memory Culture, Cambridge University Press, 2014.

 


Conférence⎜ Minka: Japanese traditional farmhouses — its legacy, lessons and future

Monday, June 25, 2018
7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. (doors open at 6:30 p.m.)
Temple University, Japan Campus, Azabu Hall 1F Parliament
Conférenciers : Yoshihiro Takishita, architect and minka restorer
Azby Brown, former director of the Future Design Institute at the Kanazawa Institute of Technology and member of Safecast
Modérateur : Kyle Cleveland, Associate Director of ICAS
Langue : anglais
RSVP : icas@tuj.temple.edu
Accès
Informations
Les vidéos des conférences de l’ICAS (Institute of Contemporary Asian Studies) sont disponibles en ligne ici.

 

Overview:
The Japanese minka — traditional farmhouses — have been celebrated worldwide as vernacular architectural masterpieces. Once ubiquitous and found in incredible variety throughout the Japanese archipelago, they are rapidly disappearing as lifestyles change and rural towns age and depopulate. A minka preservation movement has arisen, however, and an increasing number of forward-thinking individuals have devoted themselves to restoring and reusing these inspirational buildings. The motivations are not simply aesthetic, as the traditional Japanese farmstead was a model of sustainable design, careful use of scarce resources, and superb integration with natural surroundings, all of which are crucial aspects of any successful approach to the challenges we face in the future. This talk will bring together a leading minka restorer and an expert in traditional Japanese buildings and sustainable practices to discuss the unique characteristics of minka and how learning from them can better prepare us for a beautiful and sustainable future.

 

 


Conférence⎜Tokyo: in Praise of Void. An introduction to Prostho-Urbanism Principles

Jeudi 14 juin 2018 à 18h30 
Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture de Paris-Malaquais
14 rue Bonaparte – Paris – salle 206 du bâtiment Perret
Conférencier : Rafael A. Balboa
Télécharger les informations
L’extraordinaire plasticité de Tokyo et sa transformation perpétuelle semblent échapper à toute pensée orthodoxe de la ville, à toute élaboration discursive de l’urbanisme, ou sur l’urbanisme. Pour comprendre ce phénomène, il est utile d’explorer la métaphore hybride du corps humain, à la fois organique et mécaniciste. C’est ce que propose le « prostho-urbanism, ou « urbanisme prothétique » : envisager l’urbain dans ses capacités plastiques d’adaptation aux évolutions de son milieu environnant, et les relations de l’architecture à ses composantes comme celle d’une prothèse à son corps, certes central mais peut-être vide…

Rafael A. Balboa
Correspondant au Japon pour la revue d’architecture italienne Domus, Rafael A. Balboa vit à Tokyo depuis 13 ans. Après avoir obtenu un master à l’université de Tokyo dans le studio Chiba Manabu Lab (précédemment nommé le Tadao Ando Lab), il réalise un doctorat dans la même université sous la direction du professeur Kengo Kuma. Il est désormais chercheur invité à l’université de Tokyo et à l’université de Keio, ainsi que conférencier dans plusieurs écoles d’architecture au Japon et à l’étranger. Ses travaux de recherche portent sur l’application des métaphores urbaines, avec un intérêt particulier pour l’“’urbanisme prothétique” et la “Tératologie urbaine”.
Membre de la JIA (Japan Institute of Architects), il co-fonde et dirige son agence d’architecture et d’urbanisme STUDIO WASABI depuis 2013, réalisant des projets diversifiés de l’échelle domestique à l’échelle urbaine, au Japon, Mexique, Latvia et à Jakarta. Depuis 2017, il est le directeur de Casa Nano, une résidence artistique de Tokyo qui fait partie de la fondation Casa Wabi au Mexique et qui a été conçue par Tadao Ando en 2014.


Conférence⎜State Policy and Property Bubbles ― Japan and China Compared

Vendredi 15 juin 2018, 28h30-20h
Maison franco-japonais, Tokyo
Salle 601
Conférencière : Natacha Aveline (CNRS)
(Conférence en anglais sans traduction)
Modératrice: Sophie BUHNIK (UMIFRE 19 – MFJ)
Organisation: UMIFRE 19 – MFJ

Two decades after the bust of the « land bubble » in Japan,  China is experiencing a large-scale property boom. This presentation will highlight the commonalities of the speculative mechanisms in the two countries, and give account of their divergent management by state authorities. During the period between the two property booms, China’s central state has learned lessons from the systemic crises caused by real estate crashes in both Japan and in the USA. This has encouraged a policy avoiding the financialization of real estate based on US norms, and providing  « just-in-time » responses to markets signals in the housing sector.
Profil :
Natacha Aveline, PhD in urban geography, is currently permanent research director at the French National Research Center (CNRS) where she specializes in land policies and property markets. She is affiliated with the laboratory Géographie-cités (University Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne) and lectures at Science Po. She spent eleven years in East Asia, serving inter allia as director of the CNRS North Asia regional (2006-2010), and as fellow researcher at the French Research Institute on Japan (UMIFRE 19 – MFJ) in Tokyo and the French Centre for Research on Contemporary China (CEFC) in Hong Kong. Aveline’s publications focused initially on Japanese urban issues (The land bubble in Japan, The city and the rail in Japan, …) but her work is now taking a comparative perspective across Northeast Asia (Globalization and new intra-urban dynamics in Asian cities, The Invisible Population―The Place of the Dead in East Asian Megacities) owing to the support of French and European funding programs.

Conférence⎜ Japan’s Modern Castles: Reclaiming the Past and Proclaiming the Future

Mercredi 13 juin 2018, 11h-13h 
Centre de recherches sur le Japon de l’EHESS
Salle 7-51, 54 boulevard Raspail
Conférencier : Ran Zwigenberg (Université de Pennsylvania State)
Modératrice : Caroline Bodolec (CECMC-CCJ/EHESS)


« Both home and abroad, Japan’s castles serve as prominent symbols of local, regional, and national identity. Castles occupy the center of most major Japanese cities and are universally recognizable as sites of heritage and as a link to the nation’s past.  The current prominence of castles obscures their troubled modern history. After the restoration of 1868, castles, no longer of immediate military significance, became symbols of authority, on one hand, and of vaunted tradition on the other.  Castles were major sites of exhibitions, where they were often contrasted with Japan’s achievements in acquiring modern technology, serving as potent illustrations of Wakon-yōsai (Japanese spirit and Western technology). As the specific role castles played changed over time, they became sites of fierce contention. Particularly, castles were a major factor in the militarization of Japanese society before the Second World War and, after 1945, were important tools for demilitarizing Japan both physically and symbolically to turn it into a “nation of peace and culture.” This talk examines Japan’s castles from the late nineteenth century to the present to reconsider narratives of continuity and change in modern Japan; examining the changing role of castles in Japan’s troubled politics of history. »


Conférence ⎜ « Tokaido Megalopolis: Developmental State Urbanism from Growth to Shrinkage »

jeudi 24 mai, 17h – 19h
EHESS, Salle A7_37 (54 bd Raspail, 75006 Paris)
Intervenant : André Sorensen (University of Toronto)
Discutante : Beatriz Fernandez (EHESS/UPM)
Modérateur : Sébastien Lechevalier (EHESS)
Informations

This talk will examine the challenges posed by megaregions from the perspective of an analysis of the Tokaido Megalopolis, the first case of this urban scale in Asia. Debates about large-scale urbanization have seen a recent resurgence, with divergent interpretations of their significance and implications. This paper contributes to these debates from the perspective of the case of Japan, which is surprisingly absent from recent discussions which have focused primarily on the U.S., Europe, and China. When first identified as a ‘megalopolis’ in the 1960s the Japanese Tokaido region from Tokyo to Osaka was already larger and denser in population than the north-east seabord of the US, and was growing much faster. The Japanese case is particularly valuable for current debates as Tokaido’s peak growth was half a century ago during a very different period, and is a region that has already finished its urbanization phase and is now shrinking in population so the compete process of megalopolitan growth can be studied.

La conférence aura lieu en anglais.

Inscriptions à ffj@ehess.fr


Conférence ⎜ Itô Chûta : un architecte japonais dans l’Empire ottoman

Jeudi 12 avril 2018, 18h30
Maison de la culture du Japon à Paris
Conférencière : Miyuki Aoki-Girardelli, diplômée de l’Université des Techniques d’Istanbul
En japonais avec traduction consécutive en français
Entrée libre sur inscription

Itô Chûta (1867-1954), premier historien japonais de l’architecture, émit l’hypothèse d’un lien entre le Hôryûji et le Parthénon, questionnant l’échelle des valeurs qui faisait de l’architecture occidentale classique un sommet absolu. En 1902, il entreprit un tour du monde qui focalisa son intérêt sur l’architecture « orientale ». La théorie qu’il développa à son retour s’écarte radicalement du « point de départ » européen.

Miyuki Aoki-Girardelli mettra l’accent sur les éléments collectés par Chûta dans l’Empire ottoman, son passage à Paris en 1905, et une riche iconographie. Cette historienne de l’art, basée à Istanbul, est titulaire d’un doctorat en Histoire de l’Art de l’Université des Techniques d’Istanbul.  Elle a récemment publié Itô Chûta : Un architecte du Japon de Meiji dans l’Empire ottoman.

Informations et inscription


Conférence ⎜Go Hasegawa – Human and Building

Mercredi 16 mai 2018 à 19h
Pavillon de l’Arsenal, Paris 12e

Informations

Go Hasegawa obtient un diplôme de Master en ingénierie de l’Institut de Technologie de Tokyo en 2002 et travaille ensuite chez Taira Nishizawa Architects avant de fonder Go Hasegawa & Associates en 2005.

Il a enseigné au Tokyo lnstitute of Technology, à l’Académie d’Architecture de Mendrisio, à la Oslo School of Architecture and Design, et à l’Université de Californie à Los Angeles (UCLA). Il est actuellement critique d’architecture à la Harvard Graduate School of Design.
En 2015, il a reçu son doctorat en ingénierie du Tokyo lnstitute of Technology. Hasegawa a été primé à de nombreuses reprises, notamment pour le prix Shinkenchiku 2008 et en étant sélectionné parmi les dix architectes AR Design Vanguard 2014.


Journée d’étude⎜ Villes françaises, villes japonaises. Questions contemporaines en partage

Journée d’étude JAPARCHI : 11 novembre 2017, Maison franco-japonaise, Tokyo (Ebisu)

En français et en japonais, avec traduction simultanée.

使用言語:フランス語、日本語 (同時通訳付き)

Programme détaillé : télécharger le PDF

Programme résumé : télécharger le PDF

INSCRIPTION OBLIGATOIRE : www.mfj.gr.jp

Les villes françaises et japonaises partagent nombre de situations et évolutions qui méritent de croiser nos approches scientifiques. Aujourd’hui, la circulation accélérée des échanges appelle à s’interroger sur la fabrique ou la représentation de nos espaces contemporains, et sur les formes d’une production de connaissances croisées. Les thèmes abordés sont issus de problématiques partagées qui font débat. Traités à partir de ce qui les différencie comme de ce qui les rapproche, ils sont porteurs d’une attente forte dans les deux sociétés.

日仏の都市は、私たちの学術的アプローチを交差させるに値する、多くの現状と発展を共有しています。今日、交流は加速され、その循環は共有された知見が生み出したものの形と、現代の空間を代表するもの、もしくはそれを生産する場について自らに問い直すことを求めています。

今回取り組まれているテーマは、議論をもたらす日仏共通の課題の中から選ばれたものです。これらのテーマは異なるものと同様に似ているものも扱っていますが、日仏両社会において議論が大いに期待されるものです。